NWPA Growers Co-op

News and blog

News about NWPA Growers!
Posted 4/3/2020 8:33am by Amy Philson.

Our online farm store is open now until Monday at 9 a.m.  Delivery/pickup will be Wednesday, April 8.  We don't have CSA delivery this week, so only Webstore is available for members.

A sampling of what's in our store:

  • grass fed beef
  • pastured pork
  • pastured chicken
  • pastured eggs
  • lettuce and other fresh greens
  • mushrooms and ramps
  • honey
  • maple syrup
  • cheese
  • *new* goat milk yogurt
  • milk
  • bread
  • hand sanitizer and body products

All of our products are non-GMO and chemical-free.  We have NOT raised our prices, even though demand has increased and we are selling out.

Delivery options:

  • If you would like to pick up at one of our pickup locations, please choose that location at checkout. 
  • If you would like Home Delivery, please choose that option instead. 
  • All Zelie/Cranberry/Pittsburgh area locations are Home Delivery only (you can choose the Pgh location) and are subject to approval for distance.  

Please make sure we have the best phone number to reach you on delivery day, as well as address for home delivery.  Also include any instructions for home delivery in the notes section.

Go shopping here:  www.nwpagrowers.com/login

Click on the second link to log in via email, and that will let you into the store.

Email me with questions.  I will be unavailable much of Saturday, but I will try to check messages periodically.

Amy

Posted 4/1/2020 3:48pm by Amy Philson.

Today is Week 1 of Spring CSA.  We are sending this newsletter out to our entire mailing list instead of only current CSA members so you can see what's happening on our farms. 

With all of the recent changes in our society, small family farms are scrambling to meet the increased demand for local foods.  The local and regional food systems are much safer than food that is shipped hundreds or thousands of miles and handled by countless people.  We are networking with as many farms and local producers as we can to bring you more variety and quantity.

If you know of farmers who are struggling to sell their products because markets are closed or their wholesale orders have dried up, please send them our way.  We are trying to help as many farmers connect with customers as we can during this trying time.

We will continue weekly food deliveries as long as we have enough products.  We are hoping to add goat milk, goat milk yogurt, and fish to our store soon.

Farm News

Glacial Till Farm

We are pushing the limits to get you fresh vegetables as early as we can despite our very limited infrastructure. We snuck in some carrots before the impending rain event late last week.  We have also planted radishes, salad turnips, and a variety of greens.  Here spring crops are safely tucked away under row cover to keep them safe from pests and drenching rains.

Harmony Grove Farm

We started a small beef herd this year.  Our first calf was born last week with four more to go this spring.

And we released more predatory wasps.  They are only about 2mm to 4mm long.  They don't sting people; they lay eggs inside aphids and the larvae kill the aphids.

Bushel and a Peck Farm

We are pulling maple taps, cleaning out tanks, and putting equipment away from this year's maple season.  While in the woods, we checked on our ramps, and they are coming along very nicely.  Just like everything else, they are ahead of schedule.  We should have some ready for harvest next week with an abundance in two weeks.  We love this spring delicacy, and we add them to almost every savory dish that we make.

And while we were in the woods, the puppies had a great time running and jumping across the streams.  Well...maybe they need to practicing jumping a little more.

CSA Shares

  • 2 lettuce from Harmony Grove Farm
  • 1 tatsoi (spinach mustard) from Harmony Grove Farm
  • 1 garlic chives from Harmony Grove Farm
  • 1 microgreens (alfalfa, broccoli, or fenugreek) from Harmony Grove Farm
  • 1 red pac choi from Harmony Grove Farm
  • 2 oz. pea shoots from Harmony Grove Farm
  • 3 oz. cutting celery from Harmony Grove Farm
  • 2 lb. potatoes from Detweiler Farm or Miller Farm
  • 1/2 lb. onions from Detweiler Farm

Recipes

Chickpea Taco Lettuce Wraps

No-Fail Formula for Non-Boring Salads

Choy Sum (Asian Greens) with Garlic Sauce

Spicy Stir-Fried Tatsoi

Asian Ginger Bok Choi Salad and 6 other bok choi/pac choi recipes

Have a great week.  Get outside and enjoy the sunny spring days coming up.  Feast on local greens.  And above all, stay healthy!

Amy

Posted 3/27/2020 11:42am by Amy Philson.

Are you concerned about the safety of the food that you buy?  Are you looking for locally-produced food?  NWPA Growers can help!  Since we already have the ordering and delivery systems set up, we are working with many farmers in the area who have been affected by reduced wholesale orders and closed farmer's markets.

Welcome to our new mailing list members!

We are opening up our online store to orders again this weekend, which will be delivered on Wednesday, April 1.  You can meet us at our normal pickup locations, or we are offering home/workplace delivery if you're within a few miles of our route.  Pittsburgh and the 79 north corridor up to Meadville are available for home delivery as long as we have enough orders in your neighborhood to warrant a stop there (sorry Franklin and Erie areas).

Our store has lots of lettuce and greens from Harmony Grove Farm; artisanal breads from Going with the Grain Bread; various cow and goat cheeses from area dairies; beef, pork, and a little bit of chicken; eggs and milk; honey and maple syrup, and more!

You can check out our store here:  www.nwpagrowers.com/login

If you place an order, please choose your pickup location from the list if you are not a current member.  And if you want home delivery, please choose that option, even if your community is listed.

Spring CSA

We have just a few spots left in our Spring CSA, which runs every two weeks in April and May.  We need more members in some of our Pittsburgh neighborhoods in order to come there, so if you're in Pittsburgh and are looking for fresh produce this spring, be sure to sign up by Sunday night.  I will notify everyone on Monday whether your location is a go.  Sign up here.

Summer CSA

We are changing software platforms in June to Harvie, which will allow customized shares.  We are looking for pickup hosts in the Pittsburgh neighborhoods listed above.  We will also offer home delivery within a few miles of our pickup locations and route.  Email me to discuss possibilities in your neighborhood.  Find out all about Summer CSA here!

Area farmers are doing our best to feed our local communities in this turbulent time.  The local food system is the safer than grocery stores with very few people handling the food.  We are grateful to our communities for your support.

Amy Philson

NWPA Growers

Posted 3/22/2020 7:43am by Amy Philson.

The response to our offer to deliver local food this week has been tremendous.  Thank you for bearing with us as we worked out the kinks with opening our store up to everyone.

Orders need to be made by Monday at 9 a.m.  We will send an email to everyone who ordered by Tuesday with more definite times for delivery/meet-up.

We added bread to the store this weekend from Going with the Grain Bread, but it was hidden from most people.  So if you would like to order bread, you can place another order with no additional delivery charge.  I believe I got the kinks worked out of the delivery charges. 

If you have already placed an order and would like to add to it, you can choose "wholesale" at checkout to avoid the additional delivery fee.

If you would like Home Delivery, even if you live in one of the communities listed, please choose the Home Delivery option.  And make sure we have your address and phone number.

Go shopping here: www.nwpagrowers.com/login

Enjoy this sunshiney Sunday!

Amy

Posted 3/20/2020 10:17am by Amy Philson.

During these uncertain times, local farmers are continuing to raise healthy food for our communities.  With all of the shut-downs and shortages, the farmers of NWPA Growers have added additional deliveries this spring with the option of home delivery to select areas.

We are opening our online store to the general public until normal commerce resumes where you can place an order and pay with PayPal, and then we will deliver on Wednesday, March 25.  Home delivery is available if you are within a few miles of our normal route.  Or if you are further from our route, we can arrange a convenient location to meet.  Some of our regular pickup locations are closed, so we will briefly meet you in their parking lot to deliver your order.

Delivery is available to

  • Avalon
  • Bellevue
  • Ben Avon
  • Bloomfield
  • Butler
  • Carnegie
  • Cranberry Twp.
  • Grove City
  • Hermitage
  • Lawrenceville
  • Meadville
  • Mercer
  • Mt. Lebanon
  • North Shore
  • Slippery Rock
  • Squirrel Hill
  • Zelienople

This is a great way to try us out without a long commitment.  Right now our farmers have lettuce, various greens, potatoes, onions, mushrooms, eggs, maple syrup, honey, beef, pork, milk, cheese, and more.  We just added locally made salsa, too! 

Go shopping here:  http://www.nwpagrowers.com/login

Current members can also take advantage of additional deliveries right now.  We do not have CSA boxes available this week, just Webstore items.

Not on our mailing list yet?  Sign up here to have access to our store.

The ordering window will close Monday at 9 a.m., so you have all weekend to browse our store.  However, be aware that popular items can sell out quickly.

Go shopping here:  http://www.nwpagrowers.com/login

An email will be sent on Tuesday to everyone who orders with more concrete delivery times.  We will need to factor home deliveries into our route after orders are made.

All of our products are sustainably and humanely raised on small family farms in northwestern Pennsylvania with no chemicals or GMOs.  Only 1-2 people generally touch each product from field to your bag, and we are wearing gloves when we handle food products.

We reserve the right to cancel delivery to some locations if minimums aren't met.  I'm sure you will understand that we can't drive 40 miles round trip to deliver two orders to a community.  In that case, your payment will be refunded promptly.

Go shopping here:  http://www.nwpagrowers.com/login

Disclaimer:  We have had to change a bunch of settings in our store to open it to the public this weekend, so if you run into a glitch or see information that doesn't match what you read here, please let us know so we can fix it.

 

Posted 3/18/2020 2:17pm by Amy Philson.

CSA member Christopher shared mushroom cooking tips and a recipe for the Full Moon Mushrooms that many of you purchased.  I missed the recipe in my email to CSA members, so I'm sending the tips and recipe to Webstore members, too.  

Here are some quick tips for cooking with the exotic mushroom varieties from Full Moon Mushrooms

1. Since mushrooms are often round, cooking them evenly can be a challenge. A bit of careful knife work can make a big difference. For mushrooms with a stem (including smaller varieties), slice mushrooms in half down the stem and straight through the cap—this will give you one flat surface to make contact with the sauté pan. For round or frilly mushrooms (like Lion’s Mane) try to slice them through the thickest parts into flat pieces to maximize even surfaces.

2. Preheat your sauté pan before you add any fungi. Since mushrooms contain a lot of water, if you put them in a pan that’s not hot enough they will steam instead of sear, which will result in an unpleasant soggy texture.  Since you’ll be working with rather high heat (I recommend medium high), use a combination of butter and olive oil, since the olive oil will reduce the smoking point. Melt a kernel of butter in the pan and once it begins to bubble, add a swirl of olive oil. Then gradually add your mushrooms, one by one.

3. When you sauté mushrooms, be very careful not to crowd the pan. Working in batches, make sure each piece of sliced mushroom has its own space and begin on the flat side. Resist the urge to turn and flip your mushrooms and do not stir them. Let each mushroom cook on one side for several minutes.  The mushrooms must first release a bit of water and then they will begin to brown. After a few minutes, check one: if they are beginning to brown, they are ready to turn. Though it may seem fussy, turn each mushroom individually, so you can brown each side carefully.  Then add a few more nuggets of butter and a swirl of oil to help them brown on the other side. 

4. Do not add salt to mushrooms when they are cooking!  That will make them release all their liquid and you’ll wind up with what look like steamed slugs. Working in batches (see below), salt the mushrooms only after they have left the pan for a moment and have begun to cool.  And don’t be afraid to season them rather generously—taste as you go until you have hit the perfect ratio of salt to fungi.

5. If you want to add garlic, mince it finely and add it along with a little more butter only after you’ve turned the mushrooms and they are on their last thirty      seconds of cooking on the second side.

6. To garnish cooked mushrooms: in addition to a proper amount of salt and pepper, mushrooms love minced fresh herbs: parsley, chives, sage, & rosemary.

Sautéed Full Moon Exotic Mushrooms with Garlic Chives and Pea Shoots

Slice your mushrooms carefully (see the suggestions above), keeping the different varieties in separate piles. Each variety will cook at a different rate, so it’s best to sauté them separately (working in batches).

Ingredients:

1 pound exotic mushrooms (oyster, King trumpet, Lion’s mane, chestnut, etc.)

1 T. minced garlic chives Pea shoots

3 T. balsamic vinegar

1 tsp. brown sugar

Butter & Extra virgin olive oil

Coarse sea salt or Fleur de sel

Method:

1. In a small saucepan, whisk the balsamic vinegar and brown sugar together and bring to a simmer.  Continue simmering until the vinegar reduces to the consistency of thick syrup. Then remove from heat.

2. Preheat a wide sauté pan over medium high heat. Then add a nugget of butter and a swirl of olive oil; when the fats are hot, add one variety of mushrooms on their flat side in a single layer (you may have to do several batches), being careful not to crowd the pan (see tips above). When the flat side has browned, turn each mushroom individually and add a bit more butter and olive oil to the pan.  Remove the gently browned mushrooms to a large bowl and repeat until all the mushrooms have been sautéed.

3.  Season the sautéed mushrooms with salt to taste (they will permit more seasoning than you might first imagine) and add some freshly ground pepper.  Then toss with the minced garlic chives.

4. Choose a large platter and drizzle the balsamic glaze in ribbons across the bottom of the platter. Then arrange the mushrooms in a single layer on top of the glaze. Sprinkle the pea shoots among the mushrooms right before serving.   

Posted 3/18/2020 2:10pm by Amy Philson.

What a week this has been!  This whole COVID-19 business is affecting everyone differently.  Schools are shut down, so kids are home from school.  Some people are working from home.  Some are out of work temporarily.  Some are still working.  On our farm, it's mostly business as usual.  Since my children are homeschooled, nothing has changed for them.  We are going about our daily chores and other farm work normally.  The only thing that is different is that I have been extra busy keeping an eye on regional food systems, shortages, and the surge in interest in local foods.  I have been communicating with our co-op farmers and other farmers in the area in an effort to help get as much local food to our communities as we can.  With so much uncertainty at the moment regarding farmers markets, we are considering adding weekly deliveries for the spring and offering a home delivery option to people close to our route.  I have a lot of work to do today and tomorrow to make this possible for next week.  

All of your farmers are continuing life as normal for the most part.  Farm work doesn't change if the government shuts down businesses.  Plants still need tended and harvested, animals need cared for, and our customers still need to eat.  In case you missed the info on our Facebook post, here is the normal policy at Harmony Grove Farm, where all the yummy greens have come from this winter:  "We always wear gloves and disposable hats when we pack. Also we use food grade hydrogen peroxide to clean equipment, food grade plastic bags, and our water is disinfected through UV light. Hand-washing is essential and the first thing we do before working. "  Your greens are handled by one or two people (they are a husband-and-wife team without outside hired help) at harvest, and then one person handles the bags to repack them for distribution to you.  It's that way on all of our farms, with only family members harvesting and packaging.  We love that our farm products are not only fresher and more nutritious, but they are also safer from contamination than products that are shipped and displayed in stores.

Harmony Grove Farm released ladybugs last week in their greenhouses.   We are releasing 9,000 ladybugs every month, and also thousands of other beneficial insects!  

Love is in the air at Hazy Hollow Farm.  Tom and hen are paying more attention to each other lately.  They are hoping that their turkeys will hatch a brood of poults this spring.  

Derek at Glacial Till Farm says "Let's get this party started! Awesome weather for spring planting."  He has planted radishes, salad turnips, and some greens so far.  The young plants will have to be covered this weekend as temperatures turn frigid for a couple of days, and he's hoping he doesn't lose any.

CSA Shares

  • 2 lettuce from Harmony Grove Farm
  • 1 tatsoi from Harmony Grove Farm (dark green, roundish leaves)
  • 4 oz. pea shoots from Harmony Grove Farm
  • 2 microgreens from Harmony Grove Farm
  • 1 red pac choi from Harmony Grove Farm
  • 1 garlic chives from Harmony Grove Farm
  • 1 lb. Jerusalem artichokes from Bushel and a Peck Farm
  • 1 lb. onions from Detweiler Farm

Aren't you thankful for Harmony Grove Farm's hydroponic greenhouse right now??

If you aren't familiar with Jerusalem artichokes, they can be eaten the same way as potatoes.  They are a lower-carb root, so they make a great substitute for potatoes if you're watching your carbs.  From Wikipedia:  "Despite one of its names, the Jerusalem artichoke has no relationship to Jerusalem, and it is not a type of artichoke....The origin of the "Jerusalem" part of the name is uncertain. Italian settlers in the United States called the plant girasole, the Italian word for sunflower, because of its familial relationship to the garden sunflower.... Over time, the name girasole may have been changed to Jerusalem."  They are also called sunchokes.  A gentle warning, though:  because of their high inulin content, they are a prebiotic, and they tend to cause flatulence in some people.  But since all of your evening activities have been cancelled, you're safe to eat them right now.  Just keep your social distancing of 6 feet from the rest of your family.

Recipes

Many of you ordered mushrooms from our late-edition Webstore yesterday.  Thanks, Christopher, for sharing these tips:

Here are some quick tips for cooking with the exotic mushroom varieties from Full Moon Mushrooms

1. Since mushrooms are often round, cooking them evenly can be a challenge. A bit of careful knife work can make a big difference. For mushrooms with a stem (including smaller varieties), slice mushrooms in half down the stem and straight through the cap—this will give you one flat surface to make contact with the sauté pan. For round or frilly mushrooms (like Lion’s Mane) try to slice them through the thickest parts into flat pieces to maximize even surfaces.

2. Preheat your sauté pan before you add any fungi. Since mushrooms contain a lot of water, if you put them in a pan that’s not hot enough they will steam instead of sear, which will result in an unpleasant soggy texture.  Since you’ll be working with rather high heat (I recommend medium high), use a combination of butter and olive oil, since the olive oil will reduce the smoking point. Melt a kernel of butter in the pan and once it begins to bubble, add a swirl of olive oil. Then gradually add your mushrooms, one by one.

3. When you sauté mushrooms, be very careful not to crowd the pan. Working in batches, make sure each piece of sliced mushroom has its own space and begin on the flat side. Resist the urge to turn and flip your mushrooms and do not stir them. Let each mushroom cook on one side for several minutes.  The mushrooms must first release a bit of water and then they will begin to brown. After a few minutes, check one: if they are beginning to brown, they are ready to turn. Though it may seem fussy, turn each mushroom individually, so you can brown each side carefully.  Then add a few more nuggets of butter and a swirl of oil to help them brown on the other side. 

4. Do not add salt to mushrooms when they are cooking!  That will make them release all their liquid and you’ll wind up with what look like steamed slugs. Working in batches (see below), salt the mushrooms only after they have left the pan for a moment and have begun to cool.  And don’t be afraid to season them rather generously—taste as you go until you have hit the perfect ratio of salt to fungi.

5. If you want to add garlic, mince it finely and add it along with a little more butter only after you’ve turned the mushrooms and they are on their last thirty      seconds of cooking on the second side.

6. To garnish cooked mushrooms: in addition to a proper amount of salt and pepper, mushrooms love minced fresh herbs: parsley, chives, sage, & rosemary.

Pea shoots salad with sesame seeds

Baby Bok Choy Salad with Sesame Dressing.  I would skip the ramen noodles and add more almonds for crunch.  I would also add julienned carrots and maybe some other veggies, too.

All the Greens in Garlic Sauce.  Use whatever veggies your family likes/what you have on hand.  It's the sauce that makes it great, and you can change the veggies up.

Wild Mushroom and Tatsoi Bowl with Poached Egg

Spicy Stir Fried Tatsoi

Cobb Salad.  My family loves this salad.  I use uncured turkey bacon (we don't eat pork) and skip the cheese.  We make a dairy-free ranch dressing with mayo, almond or cashew milk, and coconut yogurt (that I buy from Wholesome Fare Natural Foods) along with the herbs in the recipe.

Shiitake Mushroom Lettuce Wraps

Firecracker Vegan Lettuce Wraps. If you don't eat soy, sub chicken for the tofu.

Jerusalem artichoke risotto

Roasted Jerusalem Artichokes

Fermented Jerusalem Artichokes

Be well, everyone!  Eat healthy food and enjoy increased family time.

Amy

Posted 3/15/2020 2:18pm by Amy Philson.

I'm sure that most of you are tired of hearing about the novel coronavirus.  However, we would be negligent if we didn't inform you of our response to this and other infectious agents.

As a cooperative of small family farms, we are somewhat isolated against the virus.  We don't have employees bringing in potentially harmful agents from outside since none of us routinely employs outside help like large producers.  We also don't have many visitors to our farms.

There are few hands that touch your produce (often only one or two from harvest to bagging, and then only one or two people will touch the bags).  Have you ever considered how many hands touch items that are on grocery store shelves?  Local farms are your best defense against spreading viruses via food and packaging contamination.  And our products pack superior nutrition because they are fresh and local.

That said, we are updating our safety measures to ensure that we are doing all that we can in this respect.  We will be packaging both CSA Shares and Webstore orders in plastic bags for the foreseeable future.  We have traditionally used wax boxes that we reuse each week in order to be more environmentally conscious.  However, the current climate of fear of this virus has prompted us to adopt this measure.  We hope that our customers will recycle the bags and not send them to landfills.

We will wear disposable gloves when handlinging the farm products.  We will also increase the frequency of disinfecting our delivery van and all applicable containers.

We will be working with our pickup locations to ensure the safety of your food.  Since CSA pickup can be quite brief with very limited personal contact, we don't feel the need to offer widespread home delivery.  However, if you are ill and do not have someone who can pick up your share, please contact me or your site coordinator, and we will see what we can do to help.  

Spring CSA begins April 1, just a couple of weeks away!  Our farms are filled with tiny fresh greens that are growing well since spring has come early this year.  We have plenty of local grass-fed beef, pastured pork, pastured eggs, maple syrup, honey, and more.  We still have a few spots left for delivery to Butler, Grove City, Hermitage, Meadville, Mercer, and Slippery Rock.  Home delivery is available to Cranberry Twp and some areas of Pittsburgh, as well as pickup in Bellevue.  If you haven't already, you can sign up here.

We are also continuing sign-ups for our Summer CSA, which will be fully customized according you your likes and dislikes.  If this scare changes the landscape of the international food supply, the need to be connected to local farmers will be even greater.  You can find out more about our Summer CSA here.

In closing, the need to remain connected to our communities is even more real during these precarious times.  Please don't isolate yourself from everyone, except if you are under quarantine.  Check up on your neighbors.  Drop off a jar of soup.  Offer to pick up necessities for those who are elderly or ill.  Spend time outdoors (vitamin D helps ward off illness) and look for the new growth of spring.  Slow down and enjoy life.

In health,

Amy for your farmers at NWPA Growers

 

Posted 3/4/2020 10:56am by Amy Philson.

March has definitely brought spring to our farms!  We have mud everywhere, which is typical of springtime in PA.  Spring flowers are sprouting up, calves, lambs and rabbits are being born, and we are getting ready for our spring chicks.  We are starting seeds to grow for transplanting when the soil warms.  It's a busy time on our farms.

Miller Farm

We have planted our onion seeds in the greenhouse.  They will be planted in the field later this spring.  We grow bushels of sweet onions every year.  We have also planted flowers in the greenhouse because we sell bedding plants and flower baskets from the farm in the spring.  Our chickens are laying lots of eggs and are looking forward to green grass.

Mickley Farm

If you eat farm-fresh eggs regularly, I am sure that you have seen or at least heard of a double yolk egg.  Well, a restaurant in Pittsburgh that buys our eggs had a triple yolk egg!  You are more likely to find double yolk eggs from hens just beginning their laying cycle (starting at 6-8 months of age) and at the end of their production, when they are three or more years old.  But you have a 1 in 25 million chance of finding a triple-yolker!

Bushel and a Peck Farm

We are deep into maple season.  While most people long for warm spring days very soon, we hope that we keep this freeze-thaw pattern for several weeks.  For a great sap run, we need days that are between 38 and 50 and nights below freezing.  But when the daytime temperatures stay warm for too long and the trees begin to bud, then the sap turns bitter and maple season is over.

We boiled last night, making about 45 gallons of syrup from 3900 gallons of sap.  That's a whopping 86 gallons of sap to produce just one gallon of syrup! 

It takes several of us to make syrup.  Eric and our daughter Gwen usually care for the evaporator, feeding the fire every seven minutes and monitoring temperature, foam levels, and sap flow into the pan.  They also run the reverse osmosis machine, which removes distilled water from the sap and concentrates it, making for shorter boiling time.  I am usually the one running the filter press, which filters impurities out of the syrup before it's put into sealed barrels.  Our son Elisha is always ready to check on sap levels, carry water buckets, clean up, and whatever else we need.  Our other children help as needed and do a lot of work before the season repairing lines and tapping trees.

Daily boiling will continue, since the concentrated sap only keeps for a short period before it begins to ferment.  We are collecting sap 2-3 times each day right now in our 1500 gallon tank in the woods.  Here is a photo of maple tubing leading to the sap house, where all the sap is collected and then pumped into a tank on the back of the truck.  You can see a stream running past on its way to the creek.  When we get a lot of rain or quick snow melt, the sap house floods, sometimes having a foot or two of water flowing through.  This is the same area of our woods where we dig ramps in the spring and find chanterelles in the summer/fall.

CSA Shares

  • 1/2 pint maple syrup from Philsons Bushel and a Peck Farm
  • 2 lb. red potatoes from Miller Farm
  • 1 red pac choi from Harmony Grove Farm
  • 1 arugula from Harmony Grove Farm
  • 1 lettuce from Harmony Grove Farm
  • 2 oz. garlic chives from Harmony Grove Farm
  • 1 microgreen from Harmony Grove Farm
  • 4 oz. pea shoots from Harmony Grove Farm

The Millers must have counted their potatoes incorrectly because we ended up a few bags short this morning.  We shorted Grove City members of their potatoes, and we will make it up next time.   

Recipes

Maple Banana Bread.  I would reduce the maple syrup because the bananas will add sweetness.

Maple Buttered Coffee

The BEST Healthy Granola sweetened with maple syrup.

The Best-Ever Maple Cupcakes

Garlic Herb Roasted Potatoes and Green Beans.  Use frozen green beans since they are out of season.

Fried Egg, Collard Green, and Potato Hash.  Sub pac choi, arugula, or other green.  Even pea shoots and garlic chives!

Mushroom & Greens Ramen.  I have been adding pea shoots to stir-fry or fried rice.  But I think I will add them to ramen this week.  Yum!

Lentil and Bok Choy Stir Fry

Roasted Cauliflower, Chickpea and Arugula Salad

Great for breakfast, lunch, or a light supper.  Mushroom Arugula Toast

Arugula Salad with Pea Shoots

Check out this Pea and Vanilla Cake with Lemon Icing.  Simple frozen peas are pureed and added to the batter, giving a nutrition boost and lovely green hue to the cake.  Pea shoots are only used for garnish, not in the actual recipe.  

There is only one more delivery for Winter CSA.  Have you signed up for Spring CSA yet?  It begins April 1!!

Eat well...

Amy

Posted 2/27/2020 11:30am by Amy Philson.

Hi %%user-firstname%%,  

Today is CSA Day!   Today around the country, CSA farmers are encouraging their fresh food-loving fans to join their farm as a CSA member.   Are you ready to make a commitment to your local farmer and become part of a community of people who love fresh food?  

If you haven’t joined our CSA yet, today’s the day.  We have a few slots left for our Spring CSA that runs April and May.  To sign up, visit NWPAGrowers.

To sign up for our Summer/Fall CSA, visit: https://www.harvie.farm/profile/nwpa-growers-co-op   

If you want to help us spread the word, please post about CSA Day on social media. You can use a post like this as a guide. But feel free to personalize it!  You can also share and comment on our posts on our pages on Facebook and Instagram (@nwpagrowers).

Today is #CSADay. I believe in the power of supporting your local farmer. Join me in supporting my local farmers NWPA Growers by signing up for their CSA today: https://www.harvie.farm/profile/nwpa-growers-co-op. 

We're really grateful for your help in talking up our farms. And we can’t wait to grow for you this season.

Amy for your NWPA Growers farmers