NWPA Growers Co-op
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CSA Recipes

Posted 11/1/2017 3:50pm by Amy Philson.

This is Week 22 of 24 of this season.  We have only two more weeks left in the current season.

I want to apologize if anyone was offended by our offering conventionally grown sweet potatoes.  We decided not to put them in the regular CSA shares in case anyone didn't read the email on Friday and doesn't want them.  I know that offering conventional produce is outside of our mission statement.  The matter was discussed with some (but not all) of our Board members, and we all had mixed feelings about the matter.  You see, I ask our growers every year to grow sweet potatoes, parsnips, and Brussels sprouts for CSA shares.  However, when we do have any, there are never enough.  For our Winter Shares, we get beautiful sweet potatoes from an organic farmer's cooperative in eastern PA, but we put off ordering from them until we have to because of distance and to allow our farmers to sell their produce first.  Because we know that many of our CSA members purchase sweet potatoes at the grocery store when we don't have them available, and because we have numerous requests for sweet potatoes, we allowed them to be listed in the Webstore.  I also put a very limited number in the Choice boxes and marked them "conventional" so you have a choice whether to take them. 

Based on the response in Webstore sales, many of you had similar reactions, purchasing locally grown conventional sweet potatoes where you were informed of growing practices rather than from the store where you don't know what was applied.  Others passed them up.  This farmer is considering growing naturally grown sweet potatoes for us next year.  The issue is on the agenda for our Board meeting this week, so I do not know whether we will continue to offer them.  If you would like to weigh in with your opinion, please email me.

Grateful Life Farm

This fall weather is making me think soup!  Last night we had homemade chicken noodle soup for dinner.  I use my crockpot to simmer a chicken carcass in water, either leftover from a roasted chicken, or the backs and necks from making cut ups, or a whole stewing hen.  The broth can be flavored by adding herbs such as sage, thyme, and rosemary.  I simmer for around 24 hours, then strain the broth into a large bowl and place it in the refrigerator.  The fat will harden on top and can be removed easily once the broth is chilled.  I pick through the strained bones for pieces of meat and add those into the broth.  When I'm ready to make the soup, I just sauté carrots, onions, celery and garlic in a little olive oil or butter until soft.  Then I add the broth and meat, bring to a boil, and add gluten free noodles and simmer around 20 minutes.  Salt and pepper to taste, keeping in mind you may need more salt than you think because unlike commercial broth, homemade broth is not salty.  The soup is even better the next day.  Another chicken soup variation I love is this wonderful Cream of Chicken Soup recipe from my friend Shelly.  She made it for us on a bitter January night and it was pure warmth and comfort in a bowl.  http://www.oldtime.farm/recipesresources/old-time-cream-of-chicken-soup-with-kniffles

This week we've been busy making preparations for colder weather.  We've been bringing in our gravity-fed bell waterers and draining them to keep the tubing and valves from freezing and breaking.  The laying hens will get a galvanized waterer set on an electric heated base to keep their water liquid.  For the rabbits, we just dump out their water and replace it with fresh multiple times per day.  We also covered all of our remaining lettuce, spinach, radishes, and green onions with floating row cover.  As the weather gets colder and heavy snow threatens, we plan to add a layer of plastic supported by metal hoops above the floating row cover to give two layers of insulation, a technique described by Maine grower Eliot Coleman. 

CSA Shares

Full Share

  • 1 broccoli from NuWay Farm
  • 1 bunch radishes from NuWay Farm
  • 3 delicata squash from Detweiler Farm
  • 1 lb. candy onions from Detweiler Farm
  • 1 garlic from Grateful Life Farm
  • 1 lb. red onions from Mullett Farm
  • 1 lettuce from Harmony Grove Farm
  • 1 lb. rutabaga from NuWay Farm
  • 3 choice from NuWay Farm, Detweiler Farm, Grateful Life Farm, Silver Wheel Farm, Springfield Acres, and Byler Farm
  • 1 herb from Silver Wheel Farm, Springfield Acres, and Bushel and a Peck Farm

Small Share

  • 1 broccoli from NuWay Farm
  • 1 bunch radishes from NuWay Farm
  • 1 delicata squash from Detweiler Farm
  • 1 lb. candy onions from Detweiler Farm
  • 1 lettuce from Harmony Grove Farm
  • 1 lb. rutabaga from NuWay Farm
  • 2 choice from NuWay Farm, Detweiler Farm, Grateful Life Farm, Silver Wheel Farm, Springfield Acres, and Byler Farm

Mini Share

  • 1 broccoli from NuWay Farm
  • 1 delicata squash from Detweiler Farm
  • 1 lettuce from Harmony Grove Farm
  • 1 choice from NuWay Farm, Detweiler Farm, Grateful Life Farm, Silver Wheel Farm, Springfield Acres, and Byler Farm

Recipes

Roasted Delicata Squash, Onion, and Apple Tian

Autumn Harvest Salad with Pomegranates (I would sub quinoa for the faro)

Chicken Broccoli and Mushroom Stir-Fry

Roasted Panko Parmesan Broccoli

Rutabaga Sausage Hash

Roasted Rutabaga with Maple Syrup and Thyme

Rosemary Roasted Radishes

Cabbage, Apple and Radish Coleslaw

This is a soup kind of week for me, too.  We had vegetable beef soup last night (and leftovers for lunch today), and I think I will cook a chicken to make some kind of chicken soup.  Stay warm!


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